WEEKEND EDITION
 
  Women and erotica : An uneasy relationship  
  BY SEWA BHATTARAI  
 
A young lady was once reading a copy of Osho’s ‘From Sex to Superconsciousness’ which she then lent to her teacher. When her male teacher gave it back to her, it was wrapped in a newspaper.

“I thought I was giving it to an open-minded person. But I guess that reflects our social attitude that such books aren’t be read in public,” says Bhushita Vashistha, 23, an avid reader.

 
  Burn violence survivors  
  BY CILLA KHATRY  
 
She never thought she could look at herself in the mirror ever again. The scars from the extensive burns she suffered from made her cringe and hate herself besides reminding her of the painful fact that the ones she loved and trusted and considered family were the very ones who attempted to kill her. Life had come to a standstill, an end in its own right. The trauma was seared in her and would now forever be a part of her, both physically and mentally.

“I never thought I would survive and when I did, I couldn’t bear to even look at myself,” says 21 years old Laxmi Chauhan who is known as Gudiya at Burn Violence Survivors – Nepal (BVS – Nepal), a partner of the umbrella organization Acid Survivors Trust International (ASTI).

Gudiya suffered from extreme mental and physical abuse from her husband and in-laws from the time she got married at the age of 14. Their reasons were insufficient dowry and the fact that she couldn’t bear a child. In what was probably a series of escalating violence, Gudiya was ultimately burnt alive by her sister in-law.

 
  CHINA CHRONICLES The Tibetan art of healing  
  BY CILLA KHATRY  
 
I grew up with medicines. I could say ‘ibuprofen’ before I could pronounce my own name properly. Paracetamol, tinidazole, metronidazole, amoxicillin, and erythromycin were some drugs I knew all about before I even started school. When you live with two doctors, these are very common side effects. My parents always had tablets and syrups ready for anything and everything so much so that I often asked them if they had a pill that would make me do well in Nepali too.

Another side effect is that I have always been skeptical about Ayurveda, homeopathy and anything that was not allopathic medicine. On our first day in Tibet, we were given some herbal concoction that would up our RBC volume and take care of the altitude sickness. Though I gulped it down without giving it a thought, I really didn’t think the blood-red liquid would be of any help. But minutes later I felt the woozy feeling subside and my head cleared up. Firm in my beliefs I still thought it was because of all the water I drank and not the little bottle of Tibetan medicine.

 
  A different kind of therapy  
  BY ROSHANI DHAMALA  
 
You had a rough day at work. You couldn’t meet a deadline. Your boss yelled at you. After you go home you don´t feel like speaking to your parents, and so you lock yourself up in your room. But you soon find yourself fighting over the phone with your partner.

It’s one of those days when nothing has gone right and despite struggling hard, the gazillion negative thoughts continue to haunt you.
What do you do?

 
  Learn Photography at Image Park  
  BY THE WEEK BUREAU  
 
Image Park, an organization that has been promoting photography for four years, is holding a photography workshop just before Dashain.

The workshop is open to all kinds of photography enthusiasts, from students to service holders to housewives who are beginners in photography.

The workshop teaches basic photography skills, like handling the settings of a DSLR camera, recognizing good photographs, and taking competent portrait, landscape, night, daily life, and outdoor photography. For students who have completed all levels of the course, internship placement is offered at various places.

 
  MUSINGS Badgered by books  
  BY BISWAS BARAL  
 
Agatha Christie was the one who introduced me to the world of books. Before Christie, my idea of a book was Mahendramala, Gul Mohar or Fundamentals of Physics (Ninth Edition).

When I finally came around to the real deal, there were two in particular that I wanted to finish before I died. No, neither was a Christie.

 
  Technology anyone?  
  BY NITYA PANDEY  
 
Quite recently, a friend of mine asked me a million bucks question. “What’s the difference between android and smart phones?”
“Um, aren’t smart phones bigger?” came my brilliant reply.

Well, before you form any opinions about my intellect, or sanity, let me clarify that there are no problems whatsoever, medical or otherwise. I have quite smart answers in my kitty if you were to ask me about Shakespeare or Plato. But when it comes to technology, things tend to take an entirely different turn, or rather a twist down a winding road on a steep hillock.

 
  A literary fiesta begins!  
  BY THE WEEK BUREAU  
 
The 4th NCell Literature Festival, organized by the Bookworm Foundation with support from NCell, is scheduled to be held from Friday (today), September 19 to 22 in the premises of Nepal Academy at Kamaladi.

Noted as an annual carnival that brings together academicians, poets, writers and literature lovers together, it has been garnering a lot of interest and popularity.

 
  Have your say  
  BY THE WEEK BUREAU  
 
The 2014 Asian Games or the XVII Asiad is all set to officially start from today in South Korea. Nepal is taking part in 18 different events but it has already crashed out of the U-23 football tournament with a crushing 5-0 defeat to Kuwait even before the games have officially started. What hopes do people have for Nepal? The Week finds out.

Sports have been garnering relatively more attention for the past few years in Nepal. It has become one of the best mediums for the country to be recognized in the international arena. We have been doing well in cricket. I am also quite optimistic about women’s cricket. Taekwondo is another arena where our players have been giving wonderful performances. However, I still wish that in order to bring home more medals, they should be given better training, better diet and more professional exposure. Representing one’s nation in such international events is a matter of huge prestige, and I believe that should be acknowledged.

 
  Good Reads  
  BY THE WEEK BUREAU  
 
The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing
By Benjamin Graham

This classic text is annotated to update Graham’s timeless wisdom for today’s market conditions. The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham taught and inspired people worldwide. Graham’s philosophy of “value investing” – which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies – has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949. Over the years, market developments have proven the wisdom of Graham’s strategies. While preserving the integrity of Graham’s original text, this revised edition includes updated commentary by the noted financial journalist Jason Zweig whose perspective incorporates the realities of today’s market, draws parallels between Graham’s examples and today’s financial headlines, and gives readers a more thorough understanding of how to apply Graham’s principles. In this book, Graham shares his philosophy of value investing, a concept that can protect investors from considerable errors and subsequent losses. This stock market bible advises readers to plan long term, and this revised edition contains an additional commentary by Jason Zweig. He writes about the relevance of the author’s philosophies in today’s market, and compares his examples to popular headlines in finance recently. Vital and indispensable, this is the most important book you will ever read on how to reach your financial goals.

 
 
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  • Juggling many lives
    SEWA BHATTARAI
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